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Old   #1
 
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Hello!!

Hey guys,
wanna ask ye a question
this year i'll join a higher institute of (Computer Science)(CS)

so, wanna know .. what should i learn to be able to make
a high quality CONQUER SOURCES?

C# Only or what?

thank you all .. and sorry for my bad ENGLISH ^_^



FromHell2Kill is offline  
Old 08/28/2013, 22:08   #2
 
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You can code a source using almost any language, being able to code a bit in every language is better than mastering just one language, my point of view.


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Old 08/28/2013, 22:15   #3
 
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yup i think so too .. but unfortunately alot of people told me that i have to be just perfect @ C# "no more".
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Old 08/28/2013, 22:44   #4
 
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No, learning just c# is not going to give you allot money, forget about conquer while you are in school, put all your time in your classes, i am also doing that and this is what you should do.

1. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SYSTEMS FOR MIS
2. BEGINNING VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING
3. c++ programming I

You don't have to do all the languages, talk to your teacher see what you need. but remember that there is much better language then c# you don't have to learn c# to make games choice the language you like.


LordGragen. is offline  
Old 08/28/2013, 22:52   #5
 
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My advice is not to step into system development, at all. Actually making a living out of it is rare. The competition in game development is way too high for you (assuming you have no coding experience and is at least 16+). The chance of working as a system developer is rare aswell, as it's all more or less online nowadays.


I wish I started with web development in 2006 and wouldn't of touched C#. My first PHP code was first written in late 2011, and I now run three companies all generating a good amount of money - with just me sitting at home doing something I enjoy. So, in other words, focus on web dev.
_Emme_ is offline  
Old 08/29/2013, 00:18   #6
 
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You won't learn anything practical in school, just warning you now. Anything you learn will be at a conceptual level and it's up to you to figure out how to apply it. That being said, I didn't start programming outside of school until after the 3rd computer science class in the series (advanced data structures and algorithms - aka really in-depth C++). I could have, and should have started earlier, but I was overwhelmed by people in this community and thought I was way behind. The truth is that you can do all of this without any formal schooling; there are tons of tutorials and really great documentation now. Apply the effort and start now.

With that out of the way, it's not about the languages you learn. Once you learn a language, you know pretty much all of them in that paradigm (it took me like 3 days to learn C# with a C++ background). C# is one of those general-purpose languages, but there are a LOT of languages; some are better suited for certain things. The tough part is knowing when to prefer one over another.

If you REALLY want to be a great programmer, learn the concepts of a language that falls into the imperative programming paradigm (like C# or C++, although these are multi-paradigm programming languages), then go learn some languages "purely" in their paradigm (e.g. Scheme for a functional language, Smalltalk for an object-oriented language, Prolog for a logic language, etc.), then learn the concepts of assembly in-depth. Oh, and learn those pure languages by reading the published standards. Good luck.

@'Emil - Yeah that's bad advice. I'm a 5th year senior at a reputable college for computer engineering (on the computer science side, not the electrical engineering side), and IBM hires graduates straight out of school for $72000 a year + paid vacations, health care, etc. Web development would almost never have a stable guarantee of pay that high, but I ASSURE you that the web developers who do make a lot of money have experience in languages not related to web development that gave them an edge over those who didn't, so your advice is just plain wrong and bad.
Lateralus is offline  
Old 08/29/2013, 00:51   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordGragen. View Post
No, learning just c# is not going to give you allot money, forget about conquer while you are in school, put all your time in your classes, i am also doing that and this is what you should do.

1. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SYSTEMS FOR MIS
2. BEGINNING VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING
3. c++ programming I

You don't have to do all the languages, talk to your teacher see what you need. but remember that there is much better language then c# you don't have to learn c# to make games choice the language you like.
thank's brother for your advice .. ^_^

Quote:
Originally Posted by 'Emil View Post
My advice is not to step into system development, at all. Actually making a living out of it is rare. The competition in game development is way too high for you (assuming you have no coding experience and is at least 16+). The chance of working as a system developer is rare aswell, as it's all more or less online nowadays.


I wish I started with web development in 2006 and wouldn't of touched C#. My first PHP code was first written in late 2011, and I now run three companies all generating a good amount of money - with just me sitting at home doing something I enjoy. So, in other words, focus on web dev.
Amazing :O .. i like web dev .. and i already learnt HTML/XHTML - CSS2/3 - Some PHP

you think it's good (web dev) for getting money?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
You won't learn anything practical in school, just warning you now. Anything you learn will be at a conceptual level and it's up to you to figure out how to apply it. That being said, I didn't start programming outside of school until after the 3rd computer science class in the series (advanced data structures and algorithms - aka really in-depth C++). I could have, and should have started earlier, but I was overwhelmed by people in this community and thought I was way behind. The truth is that you can do all of this without any formal schooling; there are tons of tutorials and really great documentation now. Apply the effort and start now.

With that out of the way, it's not about the languages you learn. Once you learn a language, you know pretty much all of them in that paradigm (it took me like 3 days to learn C# with a C++ background). C# is one of those general-purpose languages, but there are a LOT of languages; some are better suited for certain things. The tough part is knowing when to prefer one over another.

If you REALLY want to be a great programmer, learn the concepts of a language that falls into the imperative programming paradigm (like C# or C++, although these are multi-paradigm programming languages), then go learn some languages "purely" in their paradigm (e.g. Scheme for a functional language, Smalltalk for an object-oriented language, Prolog for a logic language, etc.), then learn the concepts of assembly in-depth. Oh, and learn those pure languages by reading the published standards. Good luck.

@'Emil - Yeah that's bad advice. I'm a 5th year senior at a reputable college for computer engineering (on the computer science side, not the electrical engineering side), and IBM hires graduates straight out of school for $72000 a year + paid vacations, health care, etc. Web development would almost never have a stable guarantee of pay that high, but I ASSURE you that the web developers who do make a lot of money have experience in languages not related to web development that gave them an edge over those who didn't, so your advice is just plain wrong and bad.
i started learning (web dev) and C# for two years .. "before joining the institute" .. your words are perfect, and i'll continue learning away from the academic education.

i hope you all understand ma language ,, cuz i'm not perfect at it
FromHell2Kill is offline  
Old 08/29/2013, 04:50   #8
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 'Emil View Post
My advice is not to step into system development, at all. Actually making a living out of it is rare. The competition in game development is way too high for you (assuming you have no coding experience and is at least 16+). The chance of working as a system developer is rare aswell, as it's all more or less online nowadays.


I wish I started with web development in 2006 and wouldn't of touched C#. My first PHP code was first written in late 2011, and I now run three companies all generating a good amount of money - with just me sitting at home doing something I enjoy. So, in other words, focus on web dev.
Learn both
Super Aids is offline  
Old 08/29/2013, 07:24   #9
 
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As he's joining the school or institute this year, there's no time to learn both, hence he should only focus on one. With that being said, I don't deny the fact that me learning C# has helped me a lot, as it gradually made me think like a programmer, the one skill that cannot be taught.

@Laterus
Good for you. You are almost certain to work for someone for the rest of your life, something I could never do. I have tried working as a programmer for others, with in-house projects ran by the boss or project mananger, or client work - I hate it. You can't be creative, in most cases you have to do it a certain way, even if it's not the best one - and more often than not you end up with a client that's complete and utterly retarded.

Needless to say as a web dev in your early years you can make money quicker, build a really nice resume and might be very successful in what you do. When it comes to system dev in the other hand, you will most likely end up at a company customizing their own system.
_Emme_ is offline  
Old 08/29/2013, 09:24   #10
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 'Emil View Post
As he's joining the school or institute this year, there's no time to learn both, hence he should only focus on one. With that being said, I don't deny the fact that me learning C# has helped me a lot, as it gradually made me think like a programmer, the one skill that cannot be taught.

@Laterus
Good for you. You are almost certain to work for someone for the rest of your life, something I could never do. I have tried working as a programmer for others, with in-house projects ran by the boss or project mananger, or client work - I hate it. You can't be creative, in most cases you have to do it a certain way, even if it's not the best one - and more often than not you end up with a client that's complete and utterly retarded.

Needless to say as a web dev in your early years you can make money quicker, build a really nice resume and might be very successful in what you do. When it comes to system dev in the other hand, you will most likely end up at a company customizing their own system.

That really depends on the company you work for, I work at a company who prefers quality over a quick buck.

This is something you can't avoid though.

I think that webdevelopment is underrated at the moment, needless to say is that those people have no clue how hard it is growing at the moment.

As one example :

A company wants to create a mobile app that is build for Android and iOS, but to build those apps you will need someone who knows Java and/or C/C++ to actually build the app.
But the technology got this far that even without knowing those languages you can build those apps using the web, you will have to write the code only once and you can target both the system.
turk55 is offline  
Old 08/29/2013, 12:20   #11
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turk55 View Post
That really depends on the company you work for, I work at a company who prefers quality over a quick buck.

This is something you can't avoid though.

I think that webdevelopment is underrated at the moment, needless to say is that those people have no clue how hard it is growing at the moment.

As one example :

A company wants to create a mobile app that is build for Android and iOS, but to build those apps you will need someone who knows Java and/or C/C++ to actually build the app.
But the technology got this far that even without knowing those languages you can build those apps using the web, you will have to write the code only once and you can target both the system.
It depends on what type of programmer you want to be, front or backend. PHP is used for the majority of the apps today (backend), whereas Objective C for example is frontend for iOS. Compare it with HTML/CSS vs PHP, ASP or RoL.
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Old 08/29/2013, 18:43   #12
 
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Python + django *.* @ web
Super Aids is offline  
Old 08/29/2013, 19:11   #13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 'Emil View Post
It depends on what type of programmer you want to be, front or backend. PHP is used for the majority of the apps today (backend), whereas Objective C for example is frontend for iOS. Compare it with HTML/CSS vs PHP, ASP or RoL.
PHP can be used for iOS and Android frontends as well
Smaehtin is offline  
Old 08/29/2013, 20:26   #14
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smaehtin View Post
PHP can be used for iOS and Android frontends as well
Not really, no. Front-end is what the user can see, whereas PHP is a server/application language and is back-end, behind the scenes. I am guessing you are talking about using web directly into an app, through a iframe sort-of. Even with this, PHP is the backend.

Example:

PHP Code:
<?php
echo 'Hello world<br/>How are you today?';
?>
The result you see is HTML front-end, not PHP.
_Emme_ is offline  
Old 08/29/2013, 21:29   #15
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 'Emil View Post
Not really, no. Front-end is what the user can see, whereas PHP is a server/application language and is back-end, behind the scenes. I am guessing you are talking about using web directly into an app, through a iframe sort-of. Even with this, PHP is the backend.

Example:

PHP Code:
<?php
echo 'Hello world<br/>How are you today?';
?>
The result you see is HTML front-end, not PHP.


There's also from Embarcadero


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